Finally, the Move!

Aha! We are finally in our new home and loving it.

It includes a specially-designed quilt closet for storing finished quilts on wire shelving with good ventilation.

There are vents at the base of the doors to let air in

And a vent on the side wall at the top to let air out, encouraging passive circulation.

And it’s nice to know the quilts will be well treated now, because some of them had a little accident on the trip here.

Luckily the boxes that got damp contained finished quilts. I just washed and dried them and they are just fine.

The rest of the quilts (for the second part of the move) were packed like this.

So, once I can get my studio set up, the quilt making will begin again! Here’s a picture of the studio

And the special knob for the studio door

There’s a house attached to the studio, as well as a yard.

If anybody is looking for a great builder in the N.C. triad area, you should know that our house was built by My Granville Home of Greensboro. They were wonderful! Feel free to contact either me or the Granville people with questions.

A Little Finish

This is a quilt top I made as I was working out the details of the Lightening pattern I did for Studio Stitch a while back.

This is only 36″ square, so it will be a quilt for Ronald McDonald House in Winston-Salem, where they use this size for incubator covers.

I quilted this on my domestic sewing machine (a Bernina 550). I did not use the BSR stitch regulator primarily because it is packed somewhere in a moving box, though honestly, I don’t feel the need for it. I quilted a meander because it is fast and easy.

My blogging friend Clair pointed out some time ago that gold thread goes with almost any quilt top, and I’ve found that to be true! This is my favorite gold thread because it does look really gold but it is NOT metallic. (Metallic thread can be a bear to quilt with.)

As always, I used Bottom Line in the bobbin. I love that thread! If you have it in black and white you can blend it with almost any backing, though I have bought a few other colors as well.

And FYI, nobody paid me to say all this, and I bought the thread with my own money, etc, etc.

In case you missed it, here’s the quilt for which this was a practice piece. Last I looked Studio Stitch still had the pattern available free with purchase and even had one bundle of fat quarters left of the fabric.

Thanks for reading, and have a good week!

 

Virtual Design Wall

I’m making a queen sized quilt from my 100 Tula City Sampler blocks using this design. I made several layouts in EQ8, my design software, and chose this one.I love this layout, but it’s turning out to be a bear to piece!

BTW, I don’t recommend this design particularly. The sashing is waaay too fiddly.

Anyway, I have assembled the top in 4 quarter panels to improve the accuracy of my piecing. Now I’m ready to assemble the panels into a quilt top, but we are still in our rental house so I don’t have much of a design wall.

I thought I would wait until I have a big design wall in the new house, but then I had another thought. I took a picture of each of the quarters, edited them all with Photoshop, and custom printed them so each quarter is 7″ square. The pictures aren’t perfect, but I think they’ll work!

Now I can play with arranging the quarters in various ways. The printed colors aren’t great (I used regular printer paper) but this is going to be much easier than moving 4 big panels around on a big design wall. I may even use this technique again when I have a big design wall available.

I’ll let you know what happens.

Some Finishes

The random number generator picked comment #3, by Mary Lindberg, as the winner of the book on quilt finishing. I have been unable to contact her. If you read this, Mary, please contact me by 6:00 this evening so I can send your book. If I don’t hear from Mary I’ll ask the random number generator to select someone else.

It seems like I’ve done a lot of quilt-making in 2021, but had little to show for it. Here, at last, are a couple of finishes. These are made using blocks from a batik swap with one of my groups, done during COVID time when we couldn’t get together.

This first one is lap size, made just for fun. It doesn’t have a home yet, but I’m sure it will find one.

Name: Batik Swap One

Size: 66″ x 54″

Blocks by: Jeri, Mary B, Rena, and me

Quilted by: Julia Madison

Here’s the second quilt from swap blocks. This one is twin size, intended for use on one of the bunk beds in the “brothers’ room” at our new house.

Name: Brothers’ Bunk Quilt

Size: Twin

Blocks by: Jeri, Mary B, Rena, and me

Quilted by: Julia Madison

And speaking of the quilter, look at these pretty sunflowers she did on one of the quilts:

Last but not least, here is the latest stack of quilts made by the same group. I’ve been slow to deliver them, but they finally went to Ronald McDonald house this past week.

 

A Terrific Resource for Quilt Finishing

The Ultimate Quilt Finishing Guide is not exaggerating in its name. I was not immediately enthusiastic because it isn’t a “modern” quilt book, but it really is “ultimate” in being very comprehensive. Pretty much everything you’ve ever learned or wanted to know about borders, batting, backing, and binding is in this book, whether you’re a modern or traditional quilter.

Photo courtesy of C&T

It’s a single resource for all the stuff I keep forgetting, like how to make bias binding from a square of fabric.

I also like the book because the authors often agree with me 😀  For example, they suggest choosing border fabric after completing the center of the quilt. This has been my method for years unless I have a specific reason for buying the border fabric at the same time as the fabrics for the center.

There is a section on squaring up the quilt top when it’s finished, and another section on squaring the quilt up after it has been quilted. This is a major hassle for many quilters, so it’s nice to have it all clearly explained and well illustrated.

There is a discussion of how to measure for borders and then attach them without distorting the edges of the quilt. I should have read that years ago, before I learned the hard way!

Other helpful topics include:

  • Choosing batting
  • Joining batting pieces
  • Binding for both plain and fancy edges

The only thing I disagreed with in the entire book is the method for joining binding ends. I’m sure the way described in the book works just fine, but I love Susan Cleveland’s “Kiss, Twist, and Wiggle” method.

An extensive section covers just about every type of border imaginable, which I particularly like. I certainly could draft any of these using EQ (Electric Quilt design software), but here they are with an explanation of how to do the math to make them fit! That last is the most important, and there are practical work-arounds when needed. For example, when a border is one that makes turning corners difficult, the authors suggest using corner squares. I like it.

This is a comprehensive guide that I’m happy to add to my quilt library. Although most of the samples in the book are more traditional looking, the authors do include many borders that would work for modern quilts, especially as the modern quilt movement seems to be diversifying a bit.

Here’s one last picture from the book:

Photo courtesy of C&T

If you’ve read this far, leave me a comment and I’ll draw a name to receive a free copy of this book. Sorry to say I can only ship to U.S. addresses. I’ll draw the winner on Sunday, July 4, a week after this post goes up. I think I can find your email if you’re a subscriber to these posts, but if you want to be sure please leave an email in your comment. And thanks for reading!

Please note: C&T provides books and products for me to review. I choose those that I like the very best to tell about in my blog.

Scrappy Triangle Swap Blocks

I’ve belonged to a block swap group for a long time, but we have done extra during COVID. Here’s the latest, a scrappy triangle block. In case you want to know, it’s made with the tri-recs tool, available several places–just ask Ms. Google.

What we haven’t done is put any of these into a quilt! Here are some ideas on layout:

And in case you’ve never made improvised scrap blocks, here are directions. We’ve been using single-color scraps, but there’s no reason the color scheme can’t be scrappy.

Start by choosing 2 scraps you like and sew them together any way you care to. If one has a curved side, you can choose to sew the curve or cut it off straight.

Trim up an edge so you can add something else.

Keep adding pieces, checking occasionally to see if your template is going to fit on the scraps.

It’s fine to add BIG pieces too in order to move things along.

Press all the seams open. Too much bulk otherwise with all those seams.

Finally, cut around your template and assemble the block.

What templates do you like to use?

Many Ways With Walking-Foot Quilting

Despite the fact that it typically takes longer than free-motion quilting, I usually prefer to quilt with my walking foot.

I’ve been working on samples for a class on walking-foot quilting I’ll be teaching later this year.. Some of these samples confirmed my previous preference for Superior brand threads, and for polyester threads particularly.

This sample was done with a famous brand of cotton quilting thread. The stitches with this thread did NOT want to sink into the quilt sandwich. They came loose at every opportunity. That was a particular problem because of the number of stops and starts in the design. I generally have good luck using the lock stitch on my machine at the beginning and end of each section, but this thread just popped right back out. Ugh.

This background was quilted with Superior Bottom Line in both the bobbin and the needle. That combination did its usual great job of showing the lines without making the thread stand out. I often use this pattern as background for fusible applique, so that’s what I did with this example. After all, what else was I going to do with that orphan block from which I cut the circle?

Then I just made a bunch of straight lines with various threads and stitches. I expect this is what most people will want to do.

There are a lot of fun quilting threads out there. So far I’ve been happiest with polyester for a number of reasons, but I also have some King Tut (cotton) that works quite well.

What’s your favorite thread for machine quilting? Maybe I’ll find something new!

Eight Years

I’ve now been blogging weekly for 8 years. One of the best things about it is “meeting” people from all over the world and reading about what they are doing. Some of them have been at it even longer than I have, though many of the bloggers I’ve “met” have since quit writing.

Here are my current favorite quilts from each of the years I’ve been blogging.

Rising star art quilt

Rising Star, made for the Quilt Alliance TWENTY contest in 2013

quilt photo

My Zippy Star Quilt and Pillow as shown in Modern Quilts Unlimited, Summer 2014

modern quilt

Happy Squares, designed and made by me, 2015

improvisational quilt

Cherrywood Toss, 2016.

scrap quilt

Scrap quilt made with strips that finish 1″ wide, 2017

Equilateral Triangles, 2018

My “Little Green Man” quilt, June 2019

“Clamshells? Really?” 2020

I’m going to delete many of the older posts since I doubt they are serving any purpose at this time. I have had a book made for each year, as suggested by my friend Linda, so I can always look back at them if I want.